Visit the Healthcare Industry Pipeline at - Download White Papers and Case Studies, Register for Webcasts!
Search Healthcare
Business at HIN:

Members Only
Click here for
subscriber access,
key word searches or
to download articles
of interest.

Audio Conferences

A complete selection of health management resources for healthcare executives. Your one-stop shop for the leading publications you need! Click here to browse our categories or conduct key word searches to find the products that best meets your needs!

HIPAA Desktop

Link your company's Web site or Intranet to HIN

Career Center
The Healthcare Intelligence Network Career Center brings together qualified healthcare management professionals seeking new career opportunities and healthcare organizations that are seeking to fill health management positions within their companies.

Earn gift certificates by referring your colleagues to the Healthcare Intelligence Network!


Behavioral Healthcare


Share this article with a colleague!

Click here for a Free trial to Jenks Healthcare Business Report

Study Confirms Link Between Depression, Abdominal Obesity

A new study at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) confirms the relationship between depression and abdominal obesity, which has been linked to an increased risk for cancer and cardiovascular disease.

Researchers examined data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study, a longitudinal study of 5,115 men and women ages 18-30 that aimed to identify the precursors of cardiovascular disease. Researchers studied the data to test whether body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference were associated with increases in depression or whether depression was associated with changes in BMI and waist circumference during a period of time. CARDIA study scientists weighed and measured the waist circumference and BMI of study participants. The waist circumference was measured to the nearest half centimeter. CARDIA researchers also asked study participants in years five, 10, 15 and 20 to rank their own level of depression.

“Looking at the CARDIA sample data, we found that everyone, as a whole, gained weight during the 15-year period of time that we examined,” said UAB Assistant Professor of Sociology Belinda Needham, Ph.D. “However, the people who started out reporting high levels of depression increased in abdominal obesity and BMI at a faster rate than those who reported fewer symptoms of depression at year five. In year five, the waist circumference of the high-depression group was about 1.6 centimeters greater than those who reported low depression. By year 20, the waist circumference of the high-depression group was about 2.6 centimeters higher than those who reported lower levels of depression. In contrast, a high initial BMI and waist circumference did not influence the rate of change in symptoms of depression over time.”

Dr. Needham said there have been reports showing that cortisol, a stress hormone, is related to depression and abdominal obesity. “There is reason to suspect that people who are depressed would have higher levels of abdominal obesity versus other parts of the body because of elevated cortisol,” she said. More studies are needed to determine the underlying causes for weight gain among those who reported being depressed, Dr. Needham said.


Source: University of Alabama at Birmingham, June 9, 2010

Depression Management Benchmarks: Trends in Integration of Behavioral and Physical Health

This resource provides actionable information from 260 organizations on their progress in targeting depression in disease management plus lessons learned from early adopters of an integrated approach to mental and physical health.

Depression Management Benchmarks: Trends in Integration of Behavioral and Physical Health is available from the Healthcare Intelligence Network for $99 by visiting our Online Bookstore or by calling toll-free (888) 446-3530.

Share this article with a colleague!

IMPORTANT NOTICE: This information is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information on the business of healthcare. It is distributed with the understanding that Healthcare Intelligence Network is not engaged in rendering legal advice. If legal advice is required, the services of a competent professional should be retained.

© Copyright 2012 Healthcare Intelligence Network Call toll-free (888) 446-3530