Disease Management Update
Volume III, No. 10
June 22, 2006

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Table of Contents

  1. Leading Health and Technology Companies Form Alliance to Improve Personal Health Through Connected Devices
  2. Disease Management Q&A: The Cost to Outfit a Patient with a Remote Monitor
  3. FDA and ISMP Launch Campaign to Reduce Medication Mistakes Caused by Unclear Medical Abbreviations
  4. Reduce Preventable Medical Errors: The Foundation for Patient Safety
  5. Anemia in Old Age Associated with Increased Mortality and Hospitalization

1.) Leading Health and Technology Companies Form Alliance to Improve Personal Health Through Connected Devices

Given the rise of chronic conditions and the rapid aging of the population, the methods of managing health will need to shift from traditional institutional settings to peoples’ everyday environments, including the home. To enable this shift, a group of technology, healthcare and fitness companies have formed the Continua Health Alliance, an open industry group that will establish an ecosystem of connected personal health and fitness products and services, making it possible for patients, caregivers and healthcare providers to more proactively address ongoing healthcare needs.

Read this article online at:
http://www.intel.com/pressroom/archive/releases/20060606corp_a.htm


2.) Disease Management Q&A: The Cost to Outfit a Patient with a Remote Monitor

Each week, a healthcare professional will respond to a reader's query on an industry trend. This week's contributor is Nina M. Schneider, BSN, RN, heart failure case manager for PinnacleHealth Systems in Harrisburg, Pa.

Question: What is the cost to set up a patient with a remote monitoring device, and after a 60-day episode can you reuse that equipment with another patient?

Answer: It doesn’t really cost us a lot to set up a new patient. I have set up the monitors myself, and it takes about 15 extra minutes during the admission to set up the monitor and teach the patient how to use it. At the end of a 60-day episode, if the patient is not stable, we’ll re-certify them and keep that monitor at that location.

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http://store.hin.com/product.asp?itemid=3259

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3.) FDA and ISMP Launch Campaign to Reduce Medication Mistakes Caused by Unclear Medical Abbreviations

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) have launched a nationwide health professional education campaign aimed at reducing the number of common but preventable sources of medication mix-ups and mistakes caused by the use of unclear medical abbreviations. Aimed at those who communicate medical information, the intent of the campaign is to help avoid serious and even potentially fatal consequences of medication errors. According to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies, there are more than 7,000 deaths a year due to medication errors. Mistakes can occur anywhere in the medication-use system, from prescribing to administering a drug in a variety of settings (hospitals, outpatient clinics, nursing homes, home care, etc.).

To read this article online, please visit:
http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/NEWS/2006/NEW01390.html


4.) Reduce Preventable Medical Errors: The Foundation for Patient Safety

Improving patient safety by reducing medical errors has become a business necessity. Safety concerns are driving investments in a new set of advanced clinical information systems, such as the computer-based patient record (CPR) and the related computerized physician order entry (CPOE). These advanced applications promise significant benefits in the area of patient safety, because access to a complete electronic patient record is fundamental to improving clinical outcomes and minimizing medical errors. However, there remains a major obstacle to achieving safety improvements: the poor quality of patient data contained in these and other information systems. The patient identity hub offers one solution to the issue of poor data quality in patient medical records.

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5.) Anemia in Old Age Associated with Increased Mortality and Hospitalization

Elderly patients who develop anemia risk serious health problems that increase the odds they will be hospitalized and nearly double the chance they will die, according to findings from a long-term study by a multi-institute research team. Anemia, a reduction in the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood that can cause fatigue, weakness and dizziness, is common in old age. But its signs are often subtle, and doctors need to be sure they carefully consider it as they evaluate older patients, say study authors, writing recently in The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences.

To read this article online, please visit:
http://biomed.gerontologyjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/61/5/474?maxtoshow=&HITS=10&hits=10&RESULTFORMAT=&fulltext=anemia&searchid=1&FIRSTINDEX=0&volume=61&issue=5&resourcetype=HWCIT


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